In an effort to raise $ 100, 8-year-old Keegan made bracelets with soda lozenges and rubber bands for sale to family and friends.

But in December, he exceeded his goal and was able to make a $ 180 cash donation to Out Youth, an LGBTQ youth support organization. For Kathryn Gonzales, Director of Operations and Programs at Out Youth, Keegan's donation was particularly significant. It's a young drag queen.

Keegan began to be interested in dresses at the age of 4 years. To support his interest, his parents began to show him images of boys and men in robes, as well as drag-queens. Once he saw queens drag, he was hooked. He tried the trail at 7 am when he went to the Austin International Drag Festival, which furthered his passion.

The past year has been devoted to finding her fairytale dragon mothers, dragter shows for all ages and even a teenage babysitter who hangs out to give him the opportunity to learn. He even had the opportunity to make his first drag performance as Kween Keekee at the Austin International Drag Festival in November. Keegan is considered a genre creator, which means that he identifies as a man but often has a feminine gender expression, and the trail is a fun and creative way to express his side female.

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"I wanted to raise money to be useful and because it's good," said Keegan. "I decided to donate to Out Youth because they support people like me and I like to raise money for the LGBTQIA community to support kids like me."

Gonzales says Out Youth was created to serve children ages 12 to 14 who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning, intersexed, asexual or allied.

"Keegan's desire to participate reminded us that younger and younger children need support," she said. "We are now wondering how we can offer LGBTQIA children methods suitable for their development, such as creating a children's cruising community."

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For almost 30 years, Out Youth has been serving young people of all sexual orientations and gender identities.

"It has been 15 years since we have done this job with joy and honor, to see our children finally able to breathe again," said Gonzales. "They go through life holding their breath and wondering who will attack them next. Through our work, they can sit, breathe and be themselves. I can not imagine doing anything else. "

Gonzales adds that Keegan's gift has made him more optimistic about the future.

"For me, Keegan's gift shows that no matter the age of a person, it's easy to recognize the value of supporting young LGBTQIA," she said. "Knowing that there are children like Keegan, who want to serve and be unhindered themselves, bodes well for the future."