Partnership for Families, Children and Adults provides immediate shelter and assistance to victims of domestic violence and several other services. Since the government closed, they have not been able to access two major grants they rely on. (Image: WTVC)

CHATTANOOGA, Tennessee –

Following President Trump's speech on the border wall Tuesday evening, some non-profit organizations that depend on federal funding are preparing for a longer government shutdown.

Federal grants provide about half of the funds needed to run the Family, Children and Adult Partnership (PFCA). The local non-profit organization provides immediate shelter and assistance to victims of domestic violence and several other services. Since the government closed, they have not been able to access two major grants they rely on.

"These funds are used to pay the salaries and utility costs of our shelter, which has a huge impact on us, and we will have 41 employees affected," said Pam Ladd, CEO of PFCA.

The Family Violence Center has a strong fund for rainy days, which has allowed it to run all of its programs to date and staff all of its equipment. But other non-profit organizations are not so lucky.

"What we had to do is really start reducing the services we offer to the victims of violence," said Rachel Bruning, Executive Director of Crossville's Avalon Center.

Bruning had to announce Tuesday to his staff that if the closure continues, they would receive an extra paycheck. After that, they will probably be laid off.

"My employees are very dedicated to the services they provide, they know how critical they are and how our customers are usually in danger of death, and many of them volunteer to continue working. to keep the doors open, "said Bruning.

At present, the Avalon Center is only able to provide its essential services, such as the 24 – hour emergency phone line and emergency shelters. In the absence of any obvious end to the government's closure, both agencies are gearing up for the long-term.

"I'd rather exaggerate and have a plan and feel we talked about it than realize one day, we're here, we have to move, so we thought a lot," said Ladd.

The leaders of the partnership say that they have enough money to remain operational in the near future. The Avalon Center says they'll be lucky to visit in February.

In Tennessee alone, more than 30 non-profit organizations that help victims of domestic violence depend on these federal grants