Maritime jobs on large ships are attracting more and more women and others looking for jobs in non-traditional jobs

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At the age of 14, while on a sailing trip aboard a sailboat in Maine, Emma Hathaway is passionate about sailing and people who make up his community.

Over the next two years, Hathaway returned from Lake Tahoe, Maine, to work in the summer. At age 15, she was a kitchen assistant on board a schooner. At age 17, she was a sailor from Hawaii to Canada. She climbed the ladder as an engineer, bosun, then third, second and first companion.

  • Peter Damgaard waits for passengers to board the Lady Washington at Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Kelsey Altamyer and Peter Damgaard erect bumpers as the Lady Washington leaves the Ocean Institute in Dana Point, California on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • The first, Kelly Greenwood, is standing on a perch that gives her a good view as the Lady Washington leaves the Ocean Institute in Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Lady Washington goes to sea in Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Lady Washington goes to sea in Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • The Lady Washington goes to sea at the Ocean Institute in Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • The Lady Washington goes to sea at the Ocean Institute in Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • The Lady Washington goes to sea at the Ocean Institute in Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • The Lady Washington goes to sea at the Ocean Institute in Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Lady Washington, left, and Hawaiian Chieftain are moored at the Ocean Institute in Dana Point, California on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Volunteer teammate Ira Moll will beach the bridge aboard the Lady Washington in Dana Point, California on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Gunners Emmorey Leonard, left, and gunner James Hsu work on the dry, damp pads for the gun on board the Lady Washington at Dana Point, California, on Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Captain Emma Hathaway, left, and First Lieutenant Kelly Greenwood aboard the Lady Washington at Dana Point, California, Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • First Lieutenant Kelly Greenwood, left, and Captain Emma Hathaway aboard the Lady Washington in Dana Point, California, Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • First Lieutenant Kelly Greenwood, left, and Captain Emma Hathaway aboard the Lady Washington in Dana Point, California, Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • First Lieutenant Kelly Greenwood, left, and Captain Emma Hathaway aboard the Lady Washington in Dana Point, California, Thursday, January 3, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

Aged 32 and captain of the Lady Washington, a historic replica of the tall ship that goes to the ports on the west coast, she discovered a career that combines her love of nature and adventure with her. ;education.

Hathaway said Thursday, Jan. 4 aboard his boat moored at the Ocean Institute in Dana Point Harbor. The boat is visiting Orange County until January 28th. knit community and because of difficult living conditions and long hours of work, you develop deep relationships. The know-how, the sense of the sea and the fact of working with the hands on the outside are things that are close to my heart. "

Hathaway is part of the small but growing number of women looking for a job in the maritime field aboard Tall Ships.

While data from the Seafarer Collective, a non-profit marine organization, accounted for only 2% of women working in the merchant marine sector, about 15 to 20% of the 150 tall ships operated by non-profit groups the national parks services of the country are: controlled by women.

These ships focus on teaching maritime history, provide opportunities for public navigation and conduct environmental and scientific research.

"Tall ships are more progressive than other maritime careers," said Hathaway. "We work a lot in a female-dominated education. The perception is that people are also good and the genre does not have much to do with what you can do. "

Jonathan Kabak, a board member of Tall Ships America and captain of 30-year-old sailing ships in Rhode Island, said, "A new category of women are taking on leadership roles. Now, more than ever, while recognizing the challenges, they have the power to recognize that they are able to command like everyone else. "

The Lady Washington is one of three bricks – a two-masted square rig ship – operating in the United States.

Launched in 1989 The Lady Washington is a replica of the real ship of this name that served in the war of independence. After major redevelopment to prepare for a commercial trip around Cape Horn, the Lady Washington helped open the black pearl and sandalwood trade in the late 1700s between Hawaii and Asia.

The rich story of "The Lady" intrigued Hathaway and she was delighted to take command on December 1, shortly after embarking on Newport Harbor.

But even as a captain, she said she still has pressure to show that she can succeed as a woman at the head of the ship.

Her first companion, Kelly Greenwood, 28, also sees him. "Chances are against you when you step on board," she said. "Nobody assumes you're the captain."

Greenwood has been aboard the Lady Washington since October, when the ship left Grays Harbor, its Washington-based dock.

Like Hathaway, Greenwood said that she was very eager for a job where she could work on the outside. After graduating from St. Lawrence University in New York, where she studied English and Environmental Studies, she found work on sailboats.

"I had a job as a deckhand and I've never looked back," she said. This is her first contract as a first lieutenant and she also wants to get a captain's license and run her own ship.

As captain, Hathaway is responsible for the safety of his crew and the safe passage of the ship. Hathaway sleeps little when the ship is en route, monitoring every change of shift, maneuvering the ship and weather. Even when the ship is docked, it requires constant vigilance.

"There are many security things that are always verified," she said. "It brings an extra level of responsibility and stress."

But the stress dissipated when sailing on the open sea when the engines are cut and the crew is working hard, she said.

"It's magic to be able to withdraw from society," Hathaway said. "The peace you have is to be far from the shore. You take a total mental break from the world. You are very content aboard the ship. "

Want to see Lady Washington?

The replica of the tall ship is moored at the Ocean Institute in Dana Point Harbor and will sail on Saturday, January 13th. For further information: 949-496-2274 or oceaninstitute.org.

The ship will be moored at the Newport Marine Base from January 18 to 28.